Speaker programme

2020 Speakers confirmed so far

Prof Mark Birch-Machin

Prof of Molecular Dermatology and Faculty Director of Business Development
Newcastle University
SPEAKER
Presentation title coming soon!
  • Biography

    Mark Birch-Machin, PhD, is Professor of Molecular Dermatology at Newcastle University (UK), Institute of Cellular Medicine, Director of Business Development for the Faculty of Medical Sciences, Visiting Professor, Adelaide (CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) and University of Adelaide) and Faculty Ambassador for the UK National Innovation Centre for Ageing.

    He previously worked at Universities in Oregon, Paris, Toronto and Adelaide. He is a member of the Editorial Board of several international dermatology journals, and national/international advisory boards (including cosmetic companies) and grant committees for skin research and UK cosmetic regulation.

    His research group focuses on the response of human skin to the environment, particularly within the context of skin ageing and has been funded over the last 30 years by UK research councils, charities, UK government as well as global companies. He has played a pivotal role in pioneering the use of mitochondrial DNA as a biomarker of sun damage in skin. He has an interest in understanding the role of mitochondria in UV and environmental-induced oxidative stress, skin cancer and the relationship between oxidative stress, nutritional status, pigmentation and skin aging as well as the science and use of sunscreens. He has published extensively including 3 different Nature journals.

    He has co-founded two spin out companies (Canadian and UK) and is also a co-inventor on multiple patents including the invention of a dermatology product that sold in over a 1,000 stores in Canada. He has a long established track record of working with international media for more than 20 years.

  • Presentation Outline

    Coming soon!

Prof. Patrick Bonnett

Development Director
UK National Innovation Centre for Ageing
SPEAKER
Presentation title coming soon!
  • Biography

    Patrick has worked widely across the applied research and innovation arenas for over 35 years in organisations ranging from small technology start-ups to internationally recognised translational research laboratories.

    He acts as an Advisor to UK Government on the Ageing Grand Challenge, is a member of Nanyang Technology University (NTU) Singapore’s International Advisory Board for ARISE (Ageing Research Institute for Society and Education) and a member of the BSI Committee Ageing Society Committee, a Board member of the Association of Innovation, Research & Technology Organisations (Airto: http://www.airto.co.uk/) and Vice Chair of the UK Science Park Association (UKSPA: http://www.ukspa.org.uk/.

  • Presentation Outline

    Coming soon!

Dr. Damilola Fajuyigbe

Scientific and Medical Strategy Manager
L’Oreal Research & Innovation
SPEAKER
Presentation title coming soon!
  • Biography

    Dr. Damilola Fajuyigbe is a scientific and medical strategy manager for L’Oréal Research & Innovation, managing Medical Directorate activities in Africa and collaborating with R&I Africa on scientific communication.

    For over 7 years now, she has actively contributed to the understanding of the impact of skin colour on photobiological responses, with first author publications in 4 international journals. She completed her PhD in Molecular Biology at the world renowned St John’s Institute of Dermatology, Guy’s Hospital,
    London.

    Now, her main research focus is on the clinical characterisation of the hair and skin physiology of Africans residing in Africa. To understand the effects of different environmental factors and grooming practices, in an attempt to give insight into the common clinical presentations of hair and skin disorders in this population.

    www.linkedin.com/in/damilola-fajuyigbe

  • Presentation Outline

    Coming soon!

Dr. Marisa Meloni

CEO
VitroScreen
SPEAKER
Targeting inflammasome mechanisms as a possible role of the microbiota in skin ageing
  • Biography

    Marisa Meloni, obtained a PhD in Drug Delivery and Cutaneous Biophysics from Renée Descartes University, Paris V. She has been contract professor of safety assessment of cosmetic products at Milano, Salerno and Padova Universities.

    Having been in charge of research and innovation within the dermo-pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry for 20 years, in 2001, Marisa founded VitroScreen, a research and testing laboratory based on in vitro science with a focus on innovation in pre-clinical studies using advanced 3D tissues models within cosmetic, pharmaceutical and chemicals industries.

  • Presentation Outline

    Coming soon!

Evamaria Kratz

Head of department for cosmetic and drugs testing
Chemical and Veterinary Surveillance Institution
SPEAKER
Presentation title coming soon!
  • Biography

    Coming soon!

  • Presentation Outline

    Coming soon!

Dr David Gunn

Senior Scientist
Unilever R&D
SPEAKER
Cell senescence - on the precipice of new anti-ageing technologies?
  • Biography

    After gaining a PhD in genetics, Dr Gunn carried out postdoctoral research at Newcastle University investigating the genetic determinants of left-right asymmetry diseases in human patients. In 2000, he joined Unilever Research and Development in the UK, focusing on genomic investigations into the mechanisms of skin ageing. As well as publishing work in many scientific journals, Dr Gunn’s research has been of particular interest to the layperson leading to coverage by TV and radio news channels, digital media and at international conferences. Working at the interface between basic scientific research and translational science, Dr Gunn’s work focuses on how biological insights can be translated into benefits for the general public and for the Unilever business alike.

  • Presentation Outline

    Introduction - As cells get older, they accumulate damage which, once it disrupts normal cell function, leads to cellular senescence. In this state, cells are unable to divide, become larger and release lots of secretory factors, such as inflammatory cytokines, which can damage surrounding cells and tissue. A number of compounds that selectively kill senescent cells (termed senolytics) have been identified, and human trials testing the efficacy of such compounds have now begun. However, the degree of presence of senescent cells in skin is relatively unknown.

    Methods - We studied skin biopsies from 200 people of European ancestry, ranging from 20-80 years of age. Photographs of individuals were used to estimate perceived age and the extent of skin wrinkling, and the biopsies used to count the number of cells positive for the senescence marker p16 and measure elastin content. In the laboratory, we used Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) to drive melanocytes into a senescent state and employed them in melanoderms (laboratory grown skin equivalents) to study their impact on epidermal physiology.

    Results - Senescent melanocytes were the main senescent cell in the epidermis, with 10% of melanocytes senescent in 60year olds (<1% in 20year olds). Those with high numbers of senescent melanocytes looked old for their age, had increased wrinkles, and aged elastin in the upper dermis. There was increased DNA damage in keratinocytes surrounding senescent melanocytes versus normal melanocytes. UVR driven senescent melanocytes damaged and disrupted normal keratinocyte functioning in melanoderms which was negated by killing the senescent melanocytes.

    Conclusions - Senescent melanocytes are a key feature of aged skin, cause DNA damage to surrounding cells, disrupt normal keratinocyte functioning, and associate with aged elastin and looking older. This work strongly implicates cell senescence as a key driver of ageing in skin, and tantalising highlights senolytics as potentially powerful new anti-ageing technologies for skin.

Stephan Bielfeldt

Vice President and Director Science and Innovation
proDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research GmbH
SPEAKER
Clinical Signs of Photoageing correlate with the Water Content in the Dermis
  • Biography

    Stephan Bielfeldt has more than twenty-five years of working experience in the field of skin research. From 2001 until 2017 he was the Director Research and CTO and become 2018 Vice President and Director of Science & Innovation at proDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research. As the head of the research department he leads a team of scientists that perform applied in vivo and in vitro research studies in the field of cosmetics, food supplements and consumer products. His specific expertise comprises claims support studies. Stephan is further a specialist in the field of photobiological studies. As the head of the technical department Stephan leads a team of scientists and engineers who develop in vivo and biophysical test methods. He is member in two societies dedicated to scientific cosmetology and has published a large amount of scientific papers mainly in the field of in vivo skin research methods and claims support.

  • Presentation Outline

    Dermal water content is known to increase with age.
    In this work we investigated the dermal water content of human forearm skin in vivo in mild to moderate photoageing by use of confocal in vivo Raman spectroscopy.
    The assessments revealed a distinct increase in dermal water in relation to photoageing. Dermal water content might be used to quantify the degree of photoageing.